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William Shatner finalizes divorce from fourth wife, will keep majority of $100 million fortune: report

William Shatner's divorce from his fourth wife, Elizabeth Martin, has been finalized, according to a new report.

The "Star Trek" actor, 88, filed for the split last month. Court documents show Shatner will be able to keep a majority of his $100 million fortune, The Blast reported.

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Court documents show the former couple had a pre-nuptial agreement in place, which allows the 88-year-old to keep his "Star Trek" royalties, the outlet said.

The actor was married to Martin for 18 years. When reached by Fox News last month, Martin shared her brother had died around the time Shatner filed for the divorce and that she was with her family "during this time of grief."

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"Respect distance from divorce topic while we grieve my brother respectfully," she added.

Representatives for Shatner did not immediately respond to Fox News' request for comment.

Shatner listed the couple's separation date as Feb. 1, 2019. He was previously hitched to Nerine Kidd, Marcy Lafferty and Gloria Rand. He shares two daughters, Lisabeth Shatner, 58, and Leslie Carol, 61, with Rand.

The actor shot to fame in the 1960s for his role as Captain James T. Kirk in the original series run of "Star Trek" and went on to have a lucrative film and TV career thereafter.

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Shatner's third marriage, to Kidd, ended in tragedy in 1999 when she died of accidental drowning in their swimming pool. Although the actor had filed for divorce after two years of marriage shortly before the incident, he explained in his 2018 book "Live Long and…What I Learned Along the Way" that he was nonetheless grief-stricken by the loss.

"After my third wife, Nerine, drowned in our swimming pool, I was twisted in grief. I was completely lost. Nerine was an alcoholic and I had failed to save her," Shatner wrote.

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"My grief was overwhelming. This was the type of pain that makes you think either I’m simply going to die, or I’m going to kill myself," he added in a separate part in the book.

Source: www.foxnews.com




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